There are many different styles of furnishings to be found at unpainted furniture stores. It has to be said most of the pieces will be mass produced reproductions. That doesn’t mean that you cannot turn it into beautiful fixtures for your home.

The key is to pick simple styles that you can polish or stain to bring out the woods natural beauty. One style that suits most homes is the Shaker style. This was developed in the period from 1770 to the 1800s. The Shakers were a religious sect originally from New England. They believed that furniture should be simple and useful but don’t let that mislead you. The very simplicity of these pieces adds to their beauty which is why the style is so popular today.

You won’t find any ornate carving or embellishment on Shaker wood furnishings. The most that these craftsmen did was to use stains to accentuate the natural beauty of the fruitwood, Maplewood or pine wood they used. You can replicate this process by staining the bare wood furniture you purchase from the unpainted furniture stores.

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You can buy Shaker reproduction furniture in a finished state but often the pieces are made from cheap woods such as gum and whitewood. They are then stained to look like mahogany or oak. Buying bare wood furniture ensures that you know exactly what type of wood you are buying and you should be able to buy real pine or Maplewood for a lower price than the complete reproduction product would have cost.

You do not need to worry that you won’t have the skills to stain the furnishings yourself. All it takes is the correct preparation and the right materials and quite a bit of patience. I am sure that you will be absolutely amazed at the finished items you will be able to create from purchases made at your local unpainted furniture stores.

Find out more about unpainted furniture stores from an enthusiast who’s been working with bare wood furniture for more than ten years! Check us out at http://www.bare-wood-furniture.com/unfinished-furniture-store/

Author: Chris Hartpence
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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People often ask how to paint bare wood thinking it must be a difficult process. But rest assured it isn’t. Like any job, the preparation is the key to getting the best possible finish.

The first question you need to ask is why would you want to paint bare wood furniture? If the piece is made from softwood then it makes sense as often the wood isn’t particularly pretty so a tint of color can work wonders. Stains and dyes are available in a variety of colors so you should have no problem finding one to suit your decorating scheme.

You must first ensure that the unpainted wood furniture is ready for painting. It may require sanding and if this is the case, you must be sure to remove all sanding dust before painting. Seal any knots or cracks with sealant before painting. You will need to prime the unit before applying paint as otherwise it may crack and peel off.

There are different wood paints available but most people now opt for water based acrylic paints as they are dry quickly, are easy to clean and kinder to the environment. If you are painting a piece of child’s furniture then you need to ensure that the materials are suitable for children. Kids have a habit of putting things in their mouth and this often includes tasting new furniture!

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If you have purchased unpainted oak wood, then you might want to reconsider painting it. Oak is a beautiful specimen and a wax finish will help to highlight its natural beauty. You can always use a tinted wax if you want to deepen the color of the finished product.

If you have purchased a piece of bare wood furniture for use outdoors, you will need to use a colored preservative to stain and protect at the same time.

Find out more about unpainted wood furniture from an enthusiast who’s been working with it for more than ten years! Check us out at http://www.bare-wood-furniture.com/unpainted-furniture/

Author: Chris Hartpence
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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